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National Childhood Network (NCN)

Health & Safety – Children

Introduction

Health & Safety - Children

In this section we hope to provide you with a range of resources that support and promote health and safety.

Eating Well

Check out our Nutrition page for information on healthy eating for children.

Keep Active

You can help your children or any children you look after to be active. Children whose parents or guardians are active are more than 5 times as likely to stay active.

Families play an important role in:

  • decreasing the chance of childhood obesity
  • decreasing the risk of children developing chronic diseases such as type 2 diabetes and heart disease
  • helping children to build strong muscles, healthy bones, agility and co-ordination
  • improving the self-esteem, mood, energy and sleep patterns of children

 

Click on this link to access getirelandactive resources 
https://www2.hse.ie/wellbeing/teaching-your-children-to-be-active.html

Rufus the Messy Monster

Safefood have made available a stakeholder resource pack which includes images, videos and handwashing messages. It is a zipped file. You can download it here:

https://www.safefood.net/getattachment/a9dc71b1-8af0-4bd3-b0d2-32d643f3da0e/Handwashing-Stakeholder-Resources.zip?lang=en-IE

Washing Hands sequence for children

Cough_and_Sneeze
Download PDF

Safe Sleep for Babies

It is not safe to place a baby on their side to sleep because they may roll onto their tummy. Babies who sleep on their tummies have a higher risk of cot death. Always lay a baby to sleep on their back, with their feet to the foot of the cot.

To learn more about safe sleep positions for babies follow this link: https://bit.ly/42BcrqA

Sun_Smart_for_Children
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Sun Safety

Here are a few tips for keeping your children safe in the sun: Keep babies under 6 months in the shade as much as possible. Keep older children safe by following the SunSmart Code. Take care whether you are in Ireland or abroad – UV damage from Irish weather is just as harmful as that from warmer climates.